How to Quickly Get Over Sales Rejection and Get Back to Prospecting

How to Quickly Get Over Sales Rejection and Get Back to Prospecting

No one enjoys rejection. When people don’t want what you’re selling, it can feel personal — as if they don’t like you, even though it’s about the product.

Rejection happens. There’s no use pretending it doesn’t. If you’re in sales, you’ve been rejected and you will be again.

But once you learn how to get over sales rejection, you’ll find that hearing no doesn’t have to stop your forward progress. With these six tips, you can move on and keep doing what works.

1. Put Your Product in Perspective

The best salespeople seem to believe in their product or service. They’re 100% on board with whatever they’re selling. But, if you go overboard, that’ll make sales rejection worse. You feel like people are stupid if they don’t understand how great the product is. Then you start getting mad at them. That doesn’t help. Be careful — too much belief in your product can jade you. So have the confidence to move on and not pass too much judgment on the naysayers.

2. Come Up With a Third Direction

Yes and no aren’t the only potential answers to a sales opportunity. In fact, think of a no as a not right now. Every relationship has a beginning, middle, and end — which means their relationship with another provider will eventually end. And when it does, you want to be available.

If someone bluntly says to me, “We’re not buying your software. We’re buying from your competitor. Their software is all-around better and we like them more,” I can respond with, “I get it. Thanks for the opportunity to talk. I’ll shoot you an email right now so you have my contact information and I’ll check in with you next quarter to see how you’re doing.”

Related: Why Securing a Relationship Is More Important Than Securing a Sale

Then I’ll call them every 60 days to keep in touch. Just because I didn’t make a sale today, that doesn’t mean I won’t in the future. Meanwhile, I keep working on new pitches and new deals every day and nurturing different relationships. I need sales in 60 days and in six years — so whenever they buy, I’ll be ready.

At some point, they won’t use their current service, so the biggest thing is to figure out how to still be involved with them.

3. Don’t Push

When people say no, don’t keep pushing. You’ll seem desperate and people don’t want to buy things that aren’t in demand. So work on your takeaway close technique. Don’t let them know you need them to buy — try backing off, knowing you’ll contact them again soon.

4. Learn From It

Look at the deals you don’t close to find the obstacles for your prospects. See if there are changes you can make based on statistical significance from your interactions with prospects and clients. Then turn that information into something you can use.

5. Remember Your Other Deals

There are other fish in the sea. You should always have more leads waiting so that success isn’t riding on one specific deal. People say no more than they say yes — that means you’ll get rejected more than you’ll close. It’s just a part of sales and we all have to deal with it.

6. Treat Your Deals Equally

As you’re learning how to not be afraid of rejection, try to mentally reframe the deals you’re working. Maybe certain clients pay more than others, but try to treat each deal equally. Don’t fixate on the return. That’s when most salespeople hit a wall — they focus so much on the “big” clients, they forget about the regular ones.

The payout from regular clients adds up! So focus on adding two new customers a month — any two clients. If you’re always adding customers, you’ve always got someone in the pipeline. You’re not only working on that $20,000 deal — you’re working on the $2,000 deal too. And when someone says no, you can move on to the next thing — you didn’t lose your only deal.

7. Don’t Forget Referrals

All your leads and customers are potential referral sources. You may not be the right fit for a prospect, but they can refer you to someone who is. The close rate is often low for the “big” deals because there’s a lot of competition, but for referrals, the close rate is pretty high. So build your referral system and have a process for bringing in new clients this way too.

When Rejection Happens Most

You’ll experience most rejection in the beginning and middle of the funnel. Remember, you’re on a fishing expedition — and sometimes you’re not in the right place at the right time. Maybe your leads aren’t as qualified as you thought. Plus, they don’t know you yet. So you’ll need to be brilliant really quick. Once you work people down the funnel, the rejection tapers off.

Don’t let rejection get you down. Get back out there and work on your next deal. If you keep building activity, you’ll soon hear a yes.

 

The Psychology of Sales: 4 Important Principles to Help You Close More Deals

The Psychology of Sales- 4 Important Principles to Help You Close More Deals

People want someone who understands, someone who “gets them.” It’s true in life, and it’s true in sales.

Salespeople aim to solve their customers’ problems. That means you have to empathize with a customer’s situation first. You have to understand the way people think: Why do they do what they do? How do they perceive the problem you’re trying to solve?

That’s the psychology of sales. The better you understand these four principles, the better you understand your customers — which means more sales and more closed deals.

4 Principles to Help You Close More Deals

1. Get to Know Your Prospect

The more you identify with your customer’s frame of mind, the more likely you are to close sales.

Otherwise, you miss the mark. Let’s say I am discussing CallProof with a government organization that keeps track of grant-funded businesses. I won’t talk to them about the sales funnel piece of CallProof. They’re not making sales, so that product feature isn’t important to them. Instead, they need a way to keep track of constituents and customers. That’s where I focus in my pitch.

Your standard pitch doesn’t apply to every prospect — so you need to understand your prospect enough to tweak your pitch to their needs.

2. Use Phrasing Intentionally

The way we use our words matters. So use words intentionally. The way you phrase questions or ask for an appointment impacts their answer.

If you need someone’s email address, don’t blatantly ask for it. Say, “I want to shoot you an email with my contact information. What’s the best email address for you?” (not “I want to send you an email. Can I have your email address?”)

If you’re trying to book an appointment, make it all about the calendar, not the appointment. So say, “What does your calendar look like Thursday at 10?” (not “Do you want to schedule an appointment this week?”)

Trying to get past the gatekeeper? When they ask what you need, reply, “I just want to see what he’s doing after lunch on Thursday.” They’ll hear “lunch” and assume you’re friends.

3. Tell a Story to Get the Sale

The biggest key to success in sales is telling the story of why you exist. What problem do you solve and how has it worked for people?

My story usually sounds something like this:

We exist because we scratched an itch. A lot of businesses have the same itch we had nine years ago. We built CallProof specifically for that. The people who buy software don’t choose the best program, because they’re not thinking about using it in real life – they’re checking boxes…

As I tell this story, I can frame the problem we solve to be similar to the problems I perceive them having. I can also paint the picture of the problems with other products without badmouthing competitors.

Related: Tell the Story, Make the Sale: Sales Conversation Starters to Improve Your Pitch

4. Know When to Say No

This isn’t quite reverse psychology, but saying no sometimes sets you up for a better long-term success. Recognize when your product won’t solve their problem. If it’s not the right fit, tell them no — even if they’re ready to buy.

Often, you’ll still get business out of that interaction. They’ll either refer you to someone who needs your product or remember you positively when their needs change.

Strategies to Skip

In the sales industry, we try tons of different tactics to see what works. In the ’80s, there were some cheesy approaches like a “yes set.” Remember that? Ask three or more questions they’ll say yes to and then tag on your real question at the end (all while nodding along for extra encouragement). That’s not one I’d recommend.

Also, I don’t endorse it, but some people swear by NLP (Neuro-Linguistic Programming). It focuses more attention on using phrases that appeal to the subconscious mind of your clients.

Psychology and Sales Must-Reads

Psychology and sales go hand in hand. So, if you’re looking to dive in a little deeper, check out these resources for further reading.

In You Can’t Teach a Kid to Ride a Bike at a Seminar, David Sandler talks about the psychology of sales and setting expectations. It’s not about faking excitement or lying to your prospect. Instead, he takes a fresh approach to client interaction that focuses more on clients and more on the value of listening.

Influence is the classic book on persuasion. Why do people say yes? Robert Cialdini teaches six universal principles that are the clutch for influencing others. It’s a must-read for salespeople.

 

Sales Funnel Management: Close More Deals by Eliminating the Noise

sales-funnel-management

If you’re looking to move your prospects from possibility to purchase, it’s time to reexamine your sales funnel management. At the top of this metaphorical funnel are any people who could potentially buy. Then, as they move closer to being a client, they move down the funnel.

But how does this funnel really help the sales process? It works toward two advantages.

1. Planning Your Sales Steps

Figuring out where people are in this process helps you manage your sales steps. So, if a person is a new prospect, you know what to do. If they’re a returning customer, they’re at a different part of the funnel, and you need to take a different action step.

Related: A Sales Lead Management Process You Can Count On

See, too often people wait for the customer or prospect to tell them to go to the next step. It works better if you figure out how to get them to the next step. Don’t just wait for it to happen — make it happen.

Look at your pipeline and ask yourself, “What’s the next action I need to do?” Keep your action simple. It shouldn’t be conducting extensive research and geological surveys. It can be as easy as setting a reminder to call them tomorrow. Use your pipeline to be proactive, not reactive.

2. Balancing Your Sales Steps

Funnel management in sales also keeps you balanced. Try to spend time with prospects in each part of your funnel: the top, middle, and bottom. You should be continually prospecting, quoting, and closing. If you focus on these areas in phases, your pipeline goes dry. The key is doing all of your essential activities regularly. Maybe you start with phone calls (the top of the funnel) and schedule a lot of appointments. Well, don’t stop making those prospecting calls when you start going to appointments.

Balance every stage of the process. That way, you keep your sales steady. Otherwise, you work a few prospects through your pipeline only to realize you have no one left at the top of your funnel. Once your current deals close, you’ll have to start at square one, and it’ll be a while before you make another sale.

More Tips for Managing Your Sales Pipeline

Keep Sales Stages Simple

The way you move people through the pipeline should be easy. Know your next steps for each level. How can you get them from the top to the middle? When you have go-to sales steps, the answer is easy.

Related: How to Close More Deals by Mapping Your Sales Process

Limit Active Prospects

You only need to focus on a few sales-ready leads at a time. Now, you might have 500 prospects, but who are the sales-ready leads you can work through the pipeline? You can’t manage 500 records and move them to their next steps. It takes too much time. Instead, you need to be able to look at your sales-ready leads daily to figure out their next step. Then figure out who will fill their spot after they buy.

I used to be a sales trainer. Our first step was to look at pipeline reports. And so often, I’d see 100 people on their forecasting reports. They were proud of it. High numbers looked great on their report, but it wasn’t actionable, much less realistic. During our training, I’d ask them to get their prospect list down to seven people. Sure, they had more options than that, but they needed a smaller number to make it manageable. So they’d choose seven deals of various sizes to focus on, and they’d start closing them. It was way easier to close two out of seven deals than it was to close two out of 100.

De-Clutter Your Funnel

Most of the time, the pipeline ends up in an Excel file. Salespeople have reporting responsibilities, so they keep this file that they tweak and submit every Friday afternoon. But after a while, they become numb to it. They’re used to looking at the same data — after you’ve seen “oddball” on there for so long, it just stays. It’s natural, but not so effective for keeping the pipeline fresh.

If you want your team to get their funnel down to seven (or however many works for your industry), let them pick which prospects they want. Then they need to literally only focus on those potential customers until they close the deal or go back to another status. Delete the others from your file for now. They’re not your focus.

Your pipeline isn’t about how many prospects you can cram into it. It’s about what’s real. If you want to close deals, you want to eliminate as much noise as possible. The only people you should deal with are the ones you’re actively pushing through your pipeline.